Hand Finished Brass Ganesh Statues - Remover of Obstacles 26cm x 21cm
Hand Finished Brass Ganesh Statues - Remover of Obstacles 26cm x 21cm
Hand Finished Brass Ganesh Statues - Remover of Obstacles 26cm x 21cm
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Hand Finished Brass Ganesh Statues - Remover of Obstacles 26cm x 21cm

Regular price $230.00

Hand Finished Brass Ganesh Statues -

Remover of Obstacles

26cm x 21cm

Handmade in India

Ganesha, Ganapati, The Lord of Beginnings, The Remover of Obstacles, and The Deity of Good Fortune, Ganesh is perhaps one of the most well known deities. He’s the son of Shiva and Parvati, two of the most prevalent and powerful gods and godesses, but despite the famous depictions of his elephant’s head, he wasn’t born that way….

The story about how Ganesh got his elephant’s head varies as you travel across India – as most things do – but one of the widely-told stories goes like this:

The Story of The Elephant-Headed Boy

A long time ago, Shiva and Parvati lived happily together upon Mt. Kailash, until Shiva was called away and had to take a long journey, leaving Parvati alone.

As time passed, Parvati grew more and more lonely, wishing she had a son to cherish and play with. Using her powers, she created Ganesh from sandalwood, turmeric, and from the flesh of her own body. She gave him life by sprinkling holy Ganges water over him, and was overjoyed with her new companion.

After some time, Parvati wanted to take a bath, and asked Ganesh to guard the door of the house for her. She told him not to let anyone pass him, no matter who they were.

Coincidentally, as Ganesh was guarding the door, his father Shiva returned from his journey, and was surprised to see someone standing at the door of his house.

‘Let me pass’ he ordered, but Ganesh refused, telling him that no one would be allowed to enter without his mother’s permission.

Shiva – being quite a quick-tempered god – was enraged that an impostor was preventing him from entering his own house, and proceeded to cut off the head of the young boy. The head flew far into the distance, and the body fell to the floor.

Hearing the commotion, Parvati ran to the door and let out a cry as she saw the body of her son lying on the floor. In floods of tears, she told Shiva that he had just killed their only son, and ordered him to revive the boy.

Dismayed at what he had done, Shiva agreed to bring their son back to life, and vowed to use the head of the first being he came across to replace the one he’d cut off.

As Shiva made his way deep into the forest, the head was nowhere to be seen. Running out of time, Shiva was worried he wouldn’t be able to bring their son back to life and make his wife happy again, until he heard loud crashing footsteps behind him.

An elephant appeared through the trees and as Shiva remembered his promise, he took his sword and swiftly cut off the elephant’s head. Picking up the large and heavy head, he took it back to his house and attached it to the body of their son. Giving him life once again, the boy awoke, this time with the head of an elephant.

Parvati was overjoyed, and although her son now had the face only a mother could love, she loved him as a mother would nonetheless. To further please his wife and as a mark of respect to his son for the loyalty and bravery it must have taken to guard the door for his mother, Shiva declared that Ganesh would be worshipped first, before any other gods.